Army test proves JLENS can target swarming boats
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Saturday, August 23, 2014


Army test proves JLENS can target swarming boats

  • JLENS ready to defend ships, critical waterways and strategic infrastructure from swarming boat threat

Early results from a recent U.S. Army test proved the Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) produced JLENS can provide target-quality data on swarming boats to a variety of defense command networks in real time.

"JLENS gives commanders more time and distance to counter dangers like swarming boats because it can detect threats from hundreds of miles away and upload targeting information to the network," said David Gulla, vice president, Global Integrated Sensors at Raytheon's Integrated Defense Systems business. "This latest success is a further demonstration of JLENS' capabilities."


During the 6-week long test, JLENS acquired and tracked multiple speed-boats conducting maneuvers on the Great Salt Lake, and then passed fire control target-quality information to a simulated higher headquarters.

"JLENS is essential to our national security because no other system has this type of 360-degree surveillance and fire control capability that can detect, track and target hundreds of land, sea and airborne threats around the clock for up to 30 days at a time," said Dean Barten, the U.S. Army's JLENS product manager. "When JLENS is deployed, it will represent a huge leap forward in our ability to help protect U.S. and coalition lives and assets."

About JLENS
JLENS, an elevated, persistent over-the-horizon sensor system, uses a powerful integrated radar system to detect, track and target a variety of threats. This capability better enables commanders to defend against threats, including hostile cruise missiles, low-flying manned and unmanned aircraft, and moving surface vehicles such as boats, mobile missile launchers, automobiles, trucks and tanks. JLENS also provides ascent phase detection of tactical ballistic missiles and large-caliber rockets.

A JLENS system, referred to as an orbit, consists of two tethered, 74-meter aerostats connected to mobile mooring stations and communications and processing groups.
The aerostats fly as high as 10,000 feet, can remain aloft and operational for up to 30 days, and can detect and target threats up to 550 km (340 statute miles) away.
One aerostat carries a 360-degree surveillance radar, while the other carries a fire control radar.

Source : Raytheon Corporation (NYSE: RTN)

Published on ASDNews: Oct 23, 2012

 

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